What others say

In this place we collect quotes and reviews from our audience. If you want to be part of this collection, go leave us some feedback!

“There is rarely a film that shows us Russia, much less Russia of the north, with such simple beauty and calm. And there is rarely a film that gives a viewer such a sense of home – with its love, warmth, and trust, as well as its fears, worries, and doubts. You leave On the Way Home feeling you have not only seen Russia in a new way, but that you see life, and yourself, in a new way too.”

David Ost, Professor of Political Science and Sociology;
New York, USA, and Wroclaw, Poland.

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“Rarely do I use the word Talent (yes, capital “T”, mind you) but this evening I experienced something I will never forget, something that shook me to the core, and made my cry – something that I feel like sharing. The film is  a m a z i n g, heart-stopping, exquisitely artistic and so overwhelmingly full of love.
The producer/director/photographer is in for a big career.
Believe you me. If you ever get a chance to see this heartfelt picture – please do. For anyone who loves Russia, anyone who has a heart still capable of feeling – it’s a MUST-SEE! Creative documentary “On the Way Home” by Sergey Kachkin.”

- Vasiliy “Brian” Komendant  
English/Russian interpretor, New York, USA

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A film about an ordinary couple, Aleksay and Valya, it could be a story from everywhere… she sits at home in the house far away from big cities, she knits and sews and waits for the husband to call and come home, next to her is her beloved protector, a dog. He is a long distance truck driver, always, literally, on the road, at home once in a while, tough working conditions, phone calls between them, you sense a good ambience, the filmmaker takes his time in accordance with the life that is presented, nothing really happens apart from the dog getting more and more ill, it dies, is buried, big grief from the side of the woman.
… and sometimes the children and grandchildren pay a visit, it is warmly described, an ordinary family, for once not a film about a Russian famliy with vodka drinking all the time, no this is a non-sensational film about a family divided because of the man’s job. At the end of the film the information is given that Aleksey is seriuosly ill.
The film has a tone, it is well composed, one could maybe have wished for more context as it comes in a fine way towards the end through truck drivers communicating their opinion about Russian politics and social conditions, at the same time as you are with Aleksey in his truck in a long and hopeless queue on the road.

   
- Tue Steen Müller, Denmark
international consultant on documentary